How to Get Your Article Published: Twenty Tips from Two Editors

Sara Dreyfuss, Marianne Ryan

Abstract


Academic librarians are expected to contribute to the profession through scholarship, service, and creativity. Many are specifically encouraged to publish, but they frequently are unsure where to begin. In this column, two editors with decades of experience at the editor’s desk offer guidance to help librarians and other information professionals get their work published. Good management of both time and the scarce resources for library research requires that the hard work of writing an article not be wasted. A few simple steps will help aspiring authors create a finished product that will be accepted for publication in a leading journal and thus enable them to share new knowledge with others in the profession.


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References


William Strunk, Jr., The Elements of Style (New York: Harcourt, Brace & Howe, 1920), 24.

Nancy Rivenburgh, “The Literature Review,” Inside Higher Ed, June 10, 2009, https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2009/06/10/literature-review.

Keri P. Mattox, “The End of the Line,” American Journalism Review, December 1998, http://ajrarchive.org/article.asp?id=1088.

David Barboza, “Chicago Will Lose a Storied Bastion of Double-Checked Facts,” New York Times, October 30, 1998, https://www.nytimes.com/1998/10/30/us/chicago-will-lose-a-storied-bastion-of-double-checked-facts.html.

Elmore Leonard et al., “Ten Rules for Writing Fiction,” The Guardian, February 19, 2010, https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/feb/20/ten-rules-for-writing-fiction-part-one.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.5860/rusq.58.1.6834

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