Management: Framing the Framework: The Rigorous Responsibilities of Library and Information Science

Nathan W. Filbert

Abstract


The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education offers library and information science (LIS) professionals a conceptual approach for leading information literacy efforts in a digital environment. But while a good start, Nathan Filbert suggests that it is not enough to validate librarianship’s transdisciplinary potential. In this column, Filbert addresses the programmatic and directional efforts necessary for LIS to realize expansive expertise in information resource management, reference, and user services in the evolving, complex, information ecosystem. Drawing on the profession’s past and present, he suggests a vision and a philosophy for mediating the infosphere of the future.—Editor


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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5860/rusq.55n3.199

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